6+ hours deep sleep.  Up @ 4:30 AM, start workout at 6:20 AM, end @ 7:15 AM.  Post workout meal at 8:15 (2 eggs, cheese, spinach & veggie scramble).

More of a CrossFit-esk type of a workout this AM.  Setting up for a heavy(er) deadlift and weighted dip workout on Friday (11/20) evening – due to be out of town on Saturday (and possibly Sunday) ==> no workout.  That’s the plan as of  the time being, anyway.

Warm-up w/sprint starts, skips, ballistic stretching, push-ups, pull-ups, etc.  Then the following:

  • 200 meter run; sprint 60 meters, stride 40 meters, sprint 60 meters, stride 40 meters.  Vibrams, indoor track.
  • Front Squat: 135 x 5; 165 x 5; 185 x 5, 5
  • BTN Push Press: 135 x 5; 165 x 5; 185 x 4, 4
  • Weighted reverse grip pull-ups: 45 x 5; 80 x 5, 5, 5

4 total rounds.  Plyo squat drops x 3 prior to each round of Front Squats; straight bar reverse grip muscle-ups x 3 prior to each round of pull-ups.

Not so much concerned with the overall time of completion, but limited rest b/t sets as much as tolerable.  Emphasis still on each individual concentric rep completion as fast as possible.  No grind sets.  Power emphasis in the 5(+/-1) rep range.

7 COMMENTS

  1. Keith,
    Thank you for sharing “detailed” workouts and giving us your insights. Would you mind giving us time/intervals details as well. How long it takes and the overall philosophy, periodization scheme in your training regime?

    • I don’t track of the overall workout completion time (as in a CrossFit WOD) per se; I do however, push myself well past my comfort zone in that I cut the rest b/t sets as much as possible while still being able to wring the most power out of every rep and every set in the workout. It’s a difficult balance to maintain, and it’s something that can’t really be quantified. My overriding workout philosophy is an attempt to maximize my power output – or, more specifically, my power-to-bodyweight ratio – over broad modal domains, and in the instantaneous to 9-seconds in duration time bracket. Folks have said that it’s a “CrossFit for sprinters” philosophy, and I’m comfortable with that analogy. Periodization for me is a non-starter due to the hectic nature of my life (work, family, etc.) outside of the workout arena. Every now and again (when I feel like I need to), I shift emphasis to hypertrophy or more raw strength, but that’s about as far as I can practically periodisize.

    • Apart from a front push-press/push-jerk, you mean? A little easier on the wrists, and this position allows me to horse more weight. Also, I consider this a 3-part movement, (1) the explosive concentric, w/plenty of hip thrust, (2) a prolonged (3 to 4 sec) eccentric and (3)power absorption (into the hips) upon eccentric failure on each rep. The third part is a highly important, often overlooked component of the movement.

  2. Keith

    I do what I think are conventional squats – bar behind neck. Did squats this way when I played rugby in my youth and have been doing them this way for the past 3 years. Any reason I should reconsider this method of squatting?

    John

    • I think in the grand scheme of things, it’s 6 in one hand, half a dozen in the other. I prefer front squats, though, because this position forces me to maintain proper form, especially when fatigue sets in — you simply cannot perform a bad front squat with any appreciable weight (you’ll topple forward). That said, I do get a better “feel” from front squats – I feel the emphasis in my quads/hams/glutes more so than in conventional squats. This is due to my build, I’m sure – check my post on the waist to inseam ratio vis-a-vis squat alternatives.

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